Day Two in Buenos Aires

Our experience on day two proved to be much more positive.  We got to walk through the nicer parts of town (Av Alvear) and got a glimpse of what Argentina would have looked like during its heydays.  Obviously the architecture isn’t as intricate as that of Paris, or as grand as that of Rome, but one can certainly see some influence.

A building on Av Alvear
One of the buildings along Av de Mayo
For you NYers, it’s the Flatiron building and the Federal Reserve building in Wall Street right next to each other : )
We did get to see a more ‘colorful’ side of BA.  El Caminito is located in La Boca (a shadier part of town), and the reason for the colorful buildings is that the port dwellers use left over paint from sprucing up the barge to paint the metal sidings.

Some interesting cartoon on the walls…
My favorite part of town is actually Puerto Madera, where all the old brick warehouses have been converted to lofts, offices, and restaurants.  Reminds me of Battery Park City because of it’s proximity to the water, albeit muddy water.
Fragata Sarmiento; sailed 40 times but never involved in combat, which is probably why it’s still afloat : )
Finally, the mechanical flower located slightly north of the Museum of Bellas Artes.  If it works, the flower petals are supposed to close at night.
We had dinner at El 22 Parilla, which is a small family joint in Palermo SOHO.  
The steak was cooked better (though under-salted), and the flan with dulce de leche and whipped cream was just amazing.  The entire dinner (2 steaks, a bottle of wine, dessert) came out to be $35 US!
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2 Responses to Day Two in Buenos Aires

  1. this is ridiculous! although i had a meal at nobu next door. had 4 cocktails, desserts and multiple entrees and apps for 155 altogether for 4 people. thanks to a friend who comped so many things and charged ridiculously little for our meal! YAY!

  2. L.Y. says:

    I know. Food is just too cheap here, but don´t tell the locals, because I´m sure they would beg to disagree.

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